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Veliko Tarnovo – legends and reality

06/02/2019 | TM6 | No Comments

Bulgaria Holidays – Veliko Tarnovo – past and contemporaneousness, legends and reality, rich cultural inheritance and active social life

The town of Veliko Tarnovo is in north central Bulgaria, in the valley of Yantra River. It has a population of around 72 000 people. It is the 15th biggest town in Bulgaria as well. Veliko Tarnovo is also one of the most beautiful towns in the country. Bulgarian and foreign tourists like to visit it a lot on their trips around Bulgaria when travel bulgaria. It’s one of the preferred Bulgaria destinations for good Bulgaria holidays as well.

Veliko Tarnovo is at a distance of 241 km from the capital – Sofia, 228 km from the city of Varna and also 107 km from the town of Ruse.

Often referred to as the ‘City of the Tsars’, Veliko Tarnovo is the crossing point of generations of Bulgarians. It has the spirit of past centuries, kept in its every stone.

Where to go in Bulgaria

bulgaria holidays, veliko tornovo

A town of many sightseeings, Veliko Tarnovo is one of the liveliest Bulgaria tourist centres. Its unique location on the three hills – Tzarevetz, Trapezitza and Sveta Gora (Holy Forest), makes it one of the loveliest towns in Bulgaria. But it also gives Veliko Tarnovo a certain charm and identity of its own. A simple walk around the town leaves you breathless once you step on the narrow cobblestone-covered streets.

Like birds on a wire, houses of the Bulgarian national Revival stay over one another. Each one of the houses is a unique monument of architecture. Veliko Tarnovo is a place where nature and everything man made live in an absolute harmony. Certainly, you will never regret having chosen Veliko Tarnovo for a place to visit on your Bulgaria holidays.

Visit one of the oldest towns in Bulgaria

Veliko Tarnovo is one of the oldest towns in the country, as its history dates back to more than five thousand years ago. Archaeological excavations are the proof.

bulgaria holidays, veliko tornovo

Veliko Tarnovo grew quickly and therefore became the strongest Bulgarian fortification of the Middle Ages. That happened between the 12th and 14th centuries. It also became the most important political, economic, cultural and religious centre of the Second Bulgarian State. In 1185 the brothers Asen and Petar declared the town a capital of the restored Bulgarian State. That put an end to the Byzantine dominion, which continued for 167 years. After becoming a capital, the town of Veliko Tarnovo developed fast. Due to becoming strong, powerful and big, Veliko Tarnovo stood second after Constantinople (Istanbul private tours) and third after Rome.

Veliko Tarnovo is the medieval fortress Tzarevetz

Where to go on Bulgaria holidays, in Veliko Tarnovo? The most important monument of culture in Veliko Tarnovo is the medieval fortress Tzarevetz. It stays on the homonymous peak, surrounded on three sides by the river Yantra. When, in the times of the Second Bulgarian State, the town of Veliko Tarnovo was the capital, Tzarevetz used to be main fortress in the country. It wasn’t a closed fortress, though but a real medieval town. In the centre of this town, the following buildings were rising: the palace, the church “St. Petka”, multiple residential and economic buildings. Also, there were water reservoirs and battle towers. The Patriarch’s residence was on the highest part of Tsarevetz, and the Patriarch’s church “The Ascension of Christ” was also very close.

The article above has been taken from www.enmarbg.com. To learn extra, please click on the next hyperlink Bulgaria holidays.

Travel Bulgaria

31/01/2019 | GM6 | No Comments

A temptation to travel Bulgaria to see the Monastery and its unique architecture

Travel Bulgaria – The Rila Monastery – unity of spirituality, culture and nature…

travel bulgaria rila monestery

The Monastery has a unique architecture and takes about 8800 sq.m. When one looks from outside, it resembles a fortress. Due to its 24-metre stone walls, the Monastery has the shape of an irregular pentagon. Once the visitor travel Bulgaria is in, though, they are impressed by its architecture. Impressive arches and colonnades, covered wooden stairs and carved verandas…

St. Ivan of Rila

The hermit St. Ivan of Rila founded the monastery during the rule of Tsar Peter I. It is normal that the monastery bears the hermit’s name. Actually the hermit lived in a cave without any material possessions not far from the monastery’s location.

The long history of the buildings in the Rila Monastery goes back to late 10th century. Then the monastic community that the Rila hermit had founded, put up the first buildings. They were not far from the cave which he occupied. Normal as it is, St. Ivan Rilski’s death was the beginning of his legendary fame. The fame of a protector of the Bulgarian people.

Monastic Community

Eventually, in the XIV century, after changing its settlement several times, the monastic community settled in the fortress of Hrelyo. He was a feudal lord under Serbian suzerainty. The oldest building in the complex, the Tower of Hrelyo, date from this period, 1334–1335. It was the monastery’s fortress. Also the place where monks lived in times of trouble. There was a small church built next to Hrelyo’s Tower as well. Gradually, the influence of the Monastery grows bigger (travellers to Bulgaria can still feel it). Due to that, its fame spreaded far away from the borders of Bulgaria. People built new buildings to meet the needs of the already big enough monastic community.

However, the arrival of the Ottomans in the end of the 14th century was followed by numerous raids. As a result of that, a destruction of the monastery in the middle of the 15th century followed as well. Thanks to donations, the Rila Monastery was rebuilt in the end of the 15th century by three brothers.

The article above has been taken from www.enmarbg.com. To learn extra, please click on the next hyperlink travel Bulgaria.

Bulgaria private tours Kazanlak

29/01/2019 | GM6 | No Comments

Bulgaria private tours Kazanlak – Twelve happy and lovely Dutch people (six couples and twelve friends) left The Netherlands to visit my beautiful and friendly country, Bulgaria.

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So, we met on Friday, 20.05, the day of their customized guided tour, private tour Bulgaria Kazanlak. They travelled from Plovdiv and I was waiting for them in the village of Tarnichane, at the rose distillery. Then, some rose picking (well, it wasn’t as early as 5 am – the usual time to start the picking up); good and detailed information about the different oleaginous roses, the process of distilling and making rose oil and rose water, etc. Definitely, everything was fine but we missed the usual 10:30 coffee break. Back to our vehicle and off to Kazanlak. We had our coffee in the centre of the town of Kazanlak, in the Valley of Roses and the Valley of Thracian Kings. A nice break under the shining sun which was so generous that day (unlike the previous and following days).

Private tour Bulgaria Kazanlak – Lion Tzar’s Fountain

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Certainly the roses we had in our bags refreshed and inspired us. And not only there but in our pockets and hands as well. We carried on with our Bulgaria private tours Kazanlak. Then we visited one of the symbols of the town – the Lion or the Tzar’s Fountain. I think you, my guests, want to come back to Kazanlak, to Bulgaria and you drank water from the fountain. The guide told you the story of the fountain and the legend that goes with it. Although it’s not a legend of too many words, it’s interesting. ‘If you like to come back to this lovely place on Earth, Kazanlak, you have to drink water from the fountain’.

The article above is available on www.enmarbg. com. If you are looking for more information, please visit bulgaria private tours kazanlak.

Neighbor part 2

29/01/2019 | GM6 | No Comments

From the huge yard, transformed into a garden, was wafted an agreeable breeze. A canary was heard singing from a nearby window, and elsewhere a sweetly grieving strain from a Chopin ballad was audible. Tkalac followed the curling smoke of his cigarette, dreaming, with eyes open, like a savage. Suddenly he winced. On his bare, perspiring neck, he felt some drops. He wiped them off with his hand-kerchief, but, alas, rain again, and from a clear June sky. The young man turned his head, and above, from the upper window among the flower-pots and blossoms, there blushed a beautiful woman who lacked words to excuse herself and was powerless to turn her eyes from his confused countenance.

Foreign French

“Along with your beautiful flowers, you are also watering nettle, madame,” he finally said in his foreign French which, reminding them so much of a child’s prattle, caused him to be well liked by the ladies.

“I am too far away to be hurt,” she retorted, continuing to observe him with childish surprise.

“But there is also nettle without thorns.”

“I am quite poor in botany, but I am willing to accept what you say.”

“Please do not go, madame; it is wonderful to look up to heaven and you in that blue sky surrounded by those beautiful flowers.”

“You are a foreigner, I gather, from your accent and manner of speech.”

“I am, to my sorrow. I am an army officer who has failed and, as you doubtless know, I teach fencing and boxing.”

“Yes, I have read about you in the newspapers. You are on the path one do? A man must work. Should my plans succeed, I shall go to Paris and, besides, teach horseback-riding. I am a passionate equestrian, and you cannot understand how I feel here without my horse. At the sight of a fine horse I become as sad as a Bedouin. We horsemen alone know that a horse and a horseman may become one; not a horse’s soul in a human body—naturally!”

“You are a survival of extinct centaurs! And have you found an Amazon?”

Siren-like giggle

Tkalac noticed how suddenly she paled and then blushed, and his eyes, darkening, filled with a surprising moisture, which confused her. He wanted to reply with warmth and great affection, but among the flowers there remained only a short greeting and a suppressed and siren-like giggle.

Thus they became acquainted.

In the evening, Tkalac did not wish to go to the city for dinner. He felt ashamed about something. The presence of a stranger embarrassed him. In the evening, in the dark room, lying on a leather sofa which served also as a bed, he felt utterly unhappy and alone. He thought of his dead mother who had spoiled him—her only child; even as a cadet he had had to go to her bed every morning before she arose.

His memories turned to his father, a colonel, the real “bruder Jovo, red of face with a white mustache, hard as a provost’s stick, wearing his civilian clothes as though they were on a hanger, and those red, dilapidated morning slippers. Even as an officer he dared not light a cigarette in the presence of his father without first asking for permission. He remembered, when taking his departure, the sudden burst of tears which flowed like molten iron, the burning of which he still felt on his cheeks.

Neighbor part 1

29/01/2019 | GM6 | No Comments

Croatian

Antun Gustav Matos – (1873-1914)

Antun Gustav Matos was the son of a village schoolmaster. Shortly after his birth he was taken to Zagreb, where he received his early education. Later he went to Vienna and studied veterinary medicine, but as that failed to interest him he went to Prague. Being without a degree, he was drafted into the army as a private. He was sent to prison for violating some military rule, but escaped to Belgrade, where he played in the orchestra of the Royal Theatre. After many wanderings through Europe, he was pardoned and returned to Zagreb, where he worked as a journalist and teacher. There he did a great deal of miscellaneous writing. He died of cancer in 1914. Matos was a literary radical and a “Realist.” As critic, teacher, and novelist, he did more than any other prose writer to develop a native Croatian literature.

The Neighbor is one of his most vivid short stories. It is here published for the first time in English. The translation is by Ivan Mladineo, to whom thanks are due for permission to use it.

The Neighbor

He was very tired. While cooling himself at a window of his apartment on the second floor, his thoughts wandered afar. He had had to leave his country on account of debts. His family had turned him away, not without giving him the necessary expenses for his journey to America. He stopped off at Geneva and began gambling, winning at poker from the Slavic, especially the Bulgarian, students. When one of the students committed suicide, because of his losses, by drowning himself in the lake, Tkalac stopped gambling and conceived a happy thought: he would rent a larger apartment, buy a few mats and start giving lessons in fencing and later on in boxing (having learned this latter sport from a Parisian expert). 

By means of the sword he made his way into the highest social circles, securing excellent recommendations, especially for Russia. After the wonderful match which placed him among the world champions, he made preparations to move to Paris. For the first time in his life he had managed to save money. The young, eccentric, cosmopolitan ladies, in particular, were paying him in a princely fashion.

He started paying off his debts in his native country. Everyone was won over by his behavior, which was undeniably good, being a heritage from a long line of heroic borderland officers, noblemen of Laudon s time. Like most of our frivolous men, he remained good at heart a childish, almost girlish, soul shining from his yellowish, eagle-like eyes; and a black, manly beard accentuated his rapacious profile, as it does in all our mountaineer descendants of hajduks and uskoks. Though he loved much, not a single woman did he really like, because at bottom he remained somewhat of a Don Quixote, dreaming of the ideal woman like all men who are brought up on the ideals of chivalry.

Bulgaria private tours

29/01/2019 | BM6 | No Comments

Sofia is ancient. It is cosmopolitan. It is the people coming and going, the empires, the political regimes… All of them gave their part in building the city it is today. A city with European atmosphere and Mediterranean spirit. Private tours in Bulgaria, one of the two oldest European capitals as well, Sofia is part of Bulgaria private tour. Also, guided Sofia tours.

Sofia has always been there, fortunately. To meet new generations, new challenges.

To start with, there used to be two settlements at the place of today’s Sofia 5000 years ago. Later, the ancient town of Serdika appeared. Philip II conquered it. Then, the city was governed by Alexander the Great. The next ruler, Constantine the Great, was in love with Serdika. They say that he once claimed ‘Serdika is my Rome!’

The oldest functioning church and one of the oldest in the world, St George Rotunda, is in Sofia. The Rotunda was a temple in Constantine’s Palace. And it was built of red bricks at the beginning of 4th century.

Together with Saint George Rotunda, the Basilica of St Sofia is one of the oldest still operating Christian temples not only on the territory of Bulgaria, but in Europe as well. Today St Sofia Church attracts with its beauty and long history. Of great interest is the rare for the Bulgarian lands architectural plan. It shows a three-nave cross-domed basilica and its underground museum of the temple. It also shows the ancient necropolis of Serdica.

This article has been taken from https://www.enmarbg.com. For more information, you can click on bulgaria private tours

Balkan Tours 2019

29/01/2019 | BM6 | No Comments

Balkan tours 2019 – Having read books or watched movies about Balkan countries; and thus thinking you know much about them. It is completely different from actually having visited and experienced them. Balkan tours 2019 opens a door for an exciting, relaxing and adventurous journey through some of the most interesting places on the Balkans.

Even if you have already been to that mystique part of the world. Believe us, you still have many things to discover and understand.

Balkan tours 2019; you will be able to visit Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Serbia, Croatia, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Albania, Montenegro, Romania. Countries, each one of which veiled in mysticism characteristic for the Balkan peninsula only. This is not a fixed tour. It is a tour tailor-made by you, designed by you only.

At first sight, the Balkans look like any other place on the world. But getting to know it better, travelling around, will take you deeper and deeper in its breathing, full of life organism. An organism composed of many cells like culture, history, food, entertainment, people…

Let’s get on the most adventurous form of transportation – the magic carpet or the flying carpet and start off. I am sure you have used it many times to instantenuously go to a preferred destination. Balkan countries are one such destination.

If we divide the Balkans according to their uniqueness and yet their sameness, a probable division would take Bulgaria to the group of breath-taking landscapes, Romania – the country of mysterious castles and the legends that go with them; Croatia – beautiful coastlines; Montenegro – again the coastlines which go with quality beaches and seasides that surround lovely old towns; Bosnia and Hercegovina with its nature and amazing waterfalls; Bulgaria and Bosnia and Herzegovina can be leaders for those who like the history of communism and socialism.

Though still a relatively-unknown region and destination; the Balkans slowly start gaining popularity. The ones of you who decide to visit that place on Earth, will definitely witness an abundance of unique architecture, history (remember it’s a region of communist past), amazing nature, relaxing and beautiful beaches… Come, come whoever you are, and enjoy this mysterious place – the Balkans.

The article above is available on https://www.enmarbg.com. If you are looking for more information, please visit balkan tours 2019

Bulgaria Private Tour

22/01/2019 | GM6 | No Comments

Make your Bulgaria private tour a way of living

Bulgaria private tour – Although Bulgaria is a small country, it offers many places to see and many things to do. Firstly, you can start with the “kuker” carnival and visit monasteries. Then, definitely enjoy the coastal and golf resorts. Also rose fields and rose festival. Last but not least, the ‘UFO’ building and so on. What is more, almost every place in Bulgaria has its own festival or celebration. Some of them are wide-known, others are celebrated in the villages or towns only. Whatever Bulgaria private tour you choose or walking tours Sofia, you are surely to feel the country under your skin. Then, once you visit the country with us, you won’t be able to stop coming back. Many emotions will find their place in you. And the best of them is that you will feel at home in this lovely country.

Visit Bulgaria for good holidays and enjoy Balkan Tours

We, “EnmarBg”, after having more than ten years of experience in tourism, decided to bring our business to Bulgaria. Bulgaria is an unspoilt country with interesting culture, beautiful nature and friendly people. Together with your Bulgaria private tour, you can have Balkan tours. That way you will visit Bulgaria and countries like Macedonia, Kosovo, Croatia. Also Serbia, Montenegro, Greece. Let’s not forget Albania and Bosnia & Herzegovina. For these tours Bulgaria is a good starting point for these Balkan holidays.

The article above has been taken from https://www.enmarbg.com. To learn extra, please click on the next hyperlink bulgaria private tour.

Istanbul City Tour

07/12/2018 | TM6 | No Comments

The miniature copy of Turkish sites

If you don’t have enough time for proper Istanbul city tour and like to explore the sights of Turkey in a short time. Or you are visiting one of the palaces in Istanbul and you feel a sudden urge to be in Konya in Mevlana Mausoleum; then Miniaturk is the place that you have to visit.

The museum that reveals the cultural and architectual heritage of 3000 years of Anatolian history, the Miniaturk opened in 2003 on the Golden Horn.

Miniaturk had been inspired by a similar theme park in the Netherlands.

Anatolia can be seen in the park

We can easily see Hagia Sophia, Topkapi Palace, Blue Mosque, Mount Nemrut, Artemis Temple there. And even Bosphorus Bridge that we can walk on. These and hundreds more dwellings, bridges, palaces, mosques, sanctuaries, towers built by people who lived and established civilizations in Anatolia can be seen in the park. The world’s largest miniature park covers an area of 60,000 m2 and consists of three main parts; the biggest of which is 5ooo m2 area of models, Mini-Turkey Park. The other two parts are Miniaturk Panorama Victory Museum and Crystal Istanbul.

Istanbul city tour cannot be replaced but the theme park can be an inspiration for the visitor to visit the original sites.

The article above has been taken from https://istanbulday.com. To learn extra, please click on the next hyperlink istanbul city tour.

Going Koptos

25/09/2017 | LM6 | No Comments

“And when he came from the temple he told me all that had happened to him. And he said: ‘I shall go to Koptos, for I must fetch this book; I will not stay any longer in the north.’ And I said, ‘Let me dissuade you, for you prepare sorrow and you will bring me into trouble in the Thebaid.’ And I laid my hand on Na.nefer.ka.ptah, to keep him from going to Koptos, but he would not listen to me; and he went to the King, and told the King all that the priest had said.

The King asked him, what it that you want is?’ and he replied, ‘Let them give me the royal boat with its belongings, for I will go to the south with Ahura and her little boy Merab, and fetch this book without delay.’ Therefore, they gave him the royal boat with its belongings, and we went with him to the haven, and sailed from there up to Koptos.

Koptos and Harpokrates

Then the priests of Isis of Koptos, and the high priest of Isis, came down to us without waiting, to meet Na.nefer.ka.ptah, and their wives also came to me. We went into the temple of Isis and Harpokrates; and Na.nefer.ka.ptah brought an ox, a goose, and some wine, and made a burnt offering and a drink offering before Isis of Koptos and Harpokrates. They brought us to a very fine house, with all good things; and Na.nefer.ka.ptah spent four days there and feasted with the priests of Isis °f Koptos, and the wives of the priests of Isis made holiday with me.

In addition, the morning of the fifth day came; and Na.nefer.ka.ptah called a priest to him, and made a magic cabin that was full of men and tackle. He put the spell upon it, put life in it, gave them breath, and sank it in the water. He filled the royal boat with sand, took leave of me, and sailed from the haven: and I sat by the river at Koptos that I might see what would become of him. And he said, Workmen, work for me, even at the place where the book is.’ In addition, they toiled by night and by day; and when they had reached it in three days, he threw the sand out, and made a shoal in the river.

And then he found on it entwined serpents and scorpions and all kinds of crawling things around the box in which the book was; and by it he found a deathless snake around the box. And he laid the spell upon the entwined serpents and scorpions and all kinds of crawling things, which were around the box, that they should not come out. And he went to the deathless snake, and fought with him, and killed him; but he came to life again, and took a new form. He then fought again with him a second time; but he came to life again, and took a third form.

Egyptian short story

24/09/2017 | LM6 | No Comments

Anonymous: about 1400 B.C.

The manuscript of this story was found during the Nineteenth Century in the tomb of a Coptic monk. Nothing is known of the author, but it is assumed that he lived not long after the time of the probable origin of the Egyptian short story. Setna and the Magic Book is one of those wonder tales that have from time immemorial evoked the admiration of the world, and particularly of the Orientals.

Whether or not the Egyptians actually believed all they were told in a fairy tale is an idle conjecture: but it seems probable that the strange happenings described in this story were accepted by many. Even the present age of science has not entirely banished a belief in magic: some of the finest of modern tales are based upon an ineradicable belief in the supernal oral.

Senta and the Macig Book

The mighty King User-maat.ra (Rameses the Great) had a son named Setna Kha.em.uast who was a great scribe, and very learned in all the ancient writings. And he heard that the magic book of Thoth, by which a man may enchant heaven and earth, and know the language of all birds and beasts, was buried in the cemetery of Memphis. And he went to search for it with his brother An.he.hor.eru; and when they found the tomb of the King’s son, Na.nefer.ka.ptah, son of the King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Mer.neb.ptah, Setna opened it and went in.

Now in the tomb was Na.nefer.ka.ptah, and with him was the ka of his wife Ahura; for though she was buried at Koptos, her kadwelt at Memphis with her husband, whom she loved. And Setna saw them seated before their offerings, and the book lay between them.

And Na.nefer.ka.ptah said to Setna, “Who are you that break into my tomb in this way?” He said, “I am Setna, son of the great King User.- maat.ra, living forever, and I come for that book which I see between you.” And Na.nefer.ka.ptah said, “It cannot be given to you.” Then said Setna, “But I will carry it away by force.”

Then Ahura said to Setna, “Do not take this book; for it will bring trouble on you, as it has upon us. Listen to what we have suffered for it.”

Turkey Women National Volleyball Team

24/09/2017 | LM6 | No Comments

Your successes as the Turkey Women’s National Volleyball Team in Europe made all of us proud. You especially were the best in receptions. What is the source of this success?

Turkey Women’s National Volleyball Team players have been playing together for a long time. When you look at it, there are very young players too but most of us are experienced players. Throughout our sports careers we all played in very high-level games and now we are able to shake off that stress and nervousness of big games. Of course, we can also say that our team is successful because it is an ambitious and energetic team.

You got married last year. Congratulations. What is the role of your family in your achievements?

Thank to my dear husband Onur

Thank you. I always say; I believe that my marriage brings me luck. My husband Onur Sonsirma is indeed my biggest supporter, he has always been by my side in tough times and good times too. If I achieved something, if I am mentioned when volleyball in Turkey is in question, both my husband and my family have great share in this. I was badly injured in 2008 but they never gave up hopes on me, always encouraged. Through this opportunity, I want to thank my dear husband Onur, my mom and dad, all my family.

What plans do you have other than volleyball?

I am not planning to do anything related to volleyball in the future; all I want is to be a mother after quitting!

How would you evaluate Turkey’s position regarding volleyball?

In Turkey, the most successful team sport is definitely volleyball. But unfortunately, I cannot say that we are appreciated decently. When a football team of our country ranked third in Europe, it was the biggest deal but when a similar thing happens in volleyball, we cannot observe such an effect. We keep saying ‘More successful we are, more support will there be’ but sadly we haven’t seen that yet.

What would you suggest to younger volleyball players who take you as an example?

Whatever you are doing, do it with love. When you do not, then it helps neither you nor others. Therefore, I suggest them to live in love, will and working hard, also to improve themselves at every turn.

Topmost flower

26/08/2017 | LM6 | No Comments

And the youth went to the valley of the acacia; and his elder brother went unto his house; his hand was laid on his head, and he cast dust on his head; he came to his house, and he slew his wife, he cast her to the dogs, and he sat in mourning for his younger brother.

Now many days after these things, the younger brother was in the valley of the acacia; there was none with him; he spent his time in hunting the beasts of the desert, and he came back in the even to lie down under the acacia, which bore his soul upon the topmost flower. And after this he built himself a tower with his own hands, in the valley of the acacia; it was full of all good things that he might provide for himself a home.

Seven lathors

And he went out from his tower, and he met the Nine Gods, who were walking forth to look upon the whole land. The Nine Gods talked one with another, and they said unto him: “Ho! Bata, bull of the Nine Gods, art thou remaining alone? Thou hast left thy village for the wife of Anpu, thy elder brother. Behold his wife is slain. Thou hast given him an answer to all that was transgressed against thee.” And their hearts were vexed for him exceedingly.

And Ra Harakhti said to Khnumu, “Behold, frame thou a woman for Bata, that he may not remain alive alone.” And Khnumu made for him a mate to dwell with him. She was more beautiful in her limbs than any woman who is in live whole land. The essence of every god was in her. The seven lathors came to see her: they said with one mouth, “She will die n sharp death.”

And Bata loved her very exceedingly, and she dwelt in his house; he passed his time in hunting the beasts of the desert, and brought and laid them before her. He said: “Go not outside, lest the sea seize thee; for I cannot rescue thee from it, for I am a woman like thee; my soul is placed on the head of the flower of the acacia; and if another find it, I must fight with him.” And he opened unto her his heart in all its nature.

Windmills in Turkey

21/03/2017 | LM6 | No Comments

Only the breeziest of hills become home to windmills, where grains are ground into flour. When the winds rouse enough might to turn their large wheels, the crushing stone begins to do its work.

Some of the windmills are struggling to resist the disruptive means of time.


Morsels of grain, now turned into fine powders, replenish markets and tables alike. Though Anatolia’s tradition of many a century has been replaced by more contemporary processes, windmills still firmly exist all around Turkey. Let us go where the wind takes us…

On Windy Hills

By far, the Bodrum peninsula houses the highest number of windmills in Turkey. Nearly all villages connected to the county have remnants of the abandoned ground-grain tradition. About eighty windmills, the oldest being nearly four hundred years old, reside on the various windy peaks of the peninsula.

The mills sitting atop Gumusluk bay resemble lions with their tails cut off — grand yet solemn. Their blades are broken, draped in pieces of torn cloth, while their interiors are in ruin. In Gumbet village, the roofs as well as the blades of many mills have disappeared completely. One gets the feeling that those beautiful cylindrical bodies will crumble at any moment. Where once they created a formation resembling a string of pearls gracing the land, some of them now serve as barns, others as storage for hay. Is it not ironic that nearly all touristic Bodrum market souvenirs feature grander semblances of these actually shattered monuments?

Windmill Museum in Yalikavak

Only the Windmill Museum in Yalikavak can help us reimagine their full, original charms. As Yalikavak’s symbol, the windmill housing the museum was repaired and put into use again as a touristic cafe by a private business owner. The pleasure of sipping tea in the shade of this old windmill, at the peak of a breezy hill, is hard to match, especially in the dead heat of summer. The picture need not be so melancholic though – help is on the way for the turn mills. The Bodrum Peninsula Promotion Foundation is currently dedicating its efforts to the restoration of all the mills in the country as well as their integration to cultural tourism.

This article is published for enmarbg. For more interesting information about tours Bulgaria, please visit tours Bulgaria Beglik Tash.

Importance of Anatolia

20/03/2017 | GM6 | No Comments

Importance of Anatolia and Yalvac in the Development of Religions

Anatolia’s generous heart and warm embrace were the tolerant setting for historical events related to the birth and spread of religions.

The development of Christianity and many of the elements crucial to it make up an important part of Anatolia’s cultural treasures.

In Palestine, the place of its birth, the new Christian faith was unable to make much progress and its adherents headed in the direction of Asia Minor-Anatolia-instead. In the next

Christianity began to spread and organize itself in Anatolia; and four cities-Antioch, Ephesus, Tarsus, and Antiocheia (Antiocheia in Pisidia, ie Yalvac) were targeted for this.

Development of Christianity in Yalvac St Paul undertook three important missions to propagate the new faith in Anatolia. Choosing this city of Antiocheia as his center, it was here that he proclaimed the new religion to all who would listen. It was from Yalvac (Antiocheia) that Christianity began to radiate all over the world.

Christian religion

One of the first four apostles of the Christian religion, Paul was also its first theoretician. His knowledge of religion was deep. An eloquent speaker with the ability to command respect and enormous drive, he played a crucial role in the spreading of the new faith.

At the time, Yalvac (Antiocheia) was a city where one could find living side by side the devotees of oriental mysteries, Jews, idolaters, and pagans. There was also, however, a class of well-off people for whom monotheism, the belief in a single, all-powerful supreme being, had a strong appeal.

This was the setting that Paul found himself in when he arrived here to preach the new religion. Paul was driven by the love for God that he bore in his heart to teach it to others and believed it was his duty to do so. And his conviction gave him the strength to travel great distances under the most difficult conditions, preaching and making converts.

When he first arrived in a new city, he would sit at a loom and weave tent-cloth not just to support himself but also as a way of meeting people, with whom he strove to establish communication and get to know them and understand their feelings. Reflecting the purity and clarity of his heart in whatever he did, he also wove a web of love and friendship as he sat at his loom.

Paul’s stay in Antiocheia

Paul’s stay in Antiocheia is described thus in Acts 13: Now when Paul and his company set sailed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia; and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem. But when they departed from Perga, they came to Antiocheia in Pisidia, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and sat down and prayed..

And when the Jews were gone out of the synagogue, the Gentiles besought that these words might be preached to them the next sabbath. Now when the congregation was broken up, many of the Jews and religious proselytes followed Paul and Barnabas who, speaking to them, persuaded them to continue in the grace of God. And the next sabbath day came almost the whole city together to hear the word of God.

As the above passage tells us, Paul continued to preach and in a short idolaters, and pagans. There was also, however, a class of well-off people for whom monotheism, the belief in a single, all-powerful supreme being, had a strong appeal. This was the setting that Paul found himself in when he arrived here to preach the new religion. Paul was driven by the love for God that he bore in his heart to teach it to others and believed it was his duty to do so. And his conviction gave him the strength to travel great distances under the most difficult conditions, preaching and making converts.

Reflecting the purity

When he first arrived in a new city, he would sit at a loom and weave tent-cloth not just to support himself but also as a way of meeting people, with whom he strove to establish communication and get to know them and understand their feelings. Reflecting the purity and clarity of his heart in whatever he did, he also wove a web of love and friendship as he sat at his loom.

Under the Edict of Milan, early in AD 311, the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great declared that the Christian worship was henceforth to be tolerated throughout the Empire. An organized church was gradually being developed, councils were held, and metropolitan sees were established.

Antiocheia was present in the First Council of Nicaea (iznik) in AD 325 and was also prominently represented in the Council of Chalcedon (Kadikoy 451), the Second (553) and Third (680-681) councils of Constantinople (istanbul), and the Second Council of Nicaea (787). In the course of time, Christianity became firmly entrenched in Antiocheia as elsewhere and the city became something of a place of pilgrimage that attracted a heavy traffic of visiting believers.

Tips From The Artists

20/03/2017 | LM6 | No Comments

With all the exhibitions opening nowadays, Istanbul is becoming a veritable art city’. Catching alt of them is out of the question. If you’d like to be guided by tips from the artist as you tour the major ones, just keep on reading!

“I Chose Art”

When asked what means one can use for political action, German artist Joseph Beuys replied, “I chose art. ’’Now, an exhibition, ‘Joseph Beuys and His Students’, at the Sakip Sabana Museum (SSM) explains a lot. You have to take time to read all the panels if you want to understand… Accompanying Beuys in the exhibition, which brings together close to 350 drawings, photographs and prints, are his students, Peter Angermann, Lothar Baumgarten, Walter Dahn, Felix Droese, Imi Giese, Imi Knoebel, Katharina Sieverding and Norbert Tadeusz. Through 1 November.

“This Is Not A Retrospective!”

‘Site’ is not a retrospective even though it covers Sarkis’s 50-year career as an artist. The artist is royally annoyed if anybody says this. Hallmark of the exhibition, curated by Levent Qalikoglu, Chief Curator of Istanbul Modern, are materials that are open-ended, multi-layered and stubbornly unfinished… as well as Sarkis’s constantly re-created installations, works he has saved up and breathed life into over the years, the costumes, the sculptures, the stained glass and the neons… Head for Istanbul Modem to see this exhibition, which the artist is continuously renewing. Through 10 October.

The Price of Water

20/03/2017 | BM6 | No Comments

Vienna can boast the world’s best tap water. But is that a reason to charge for a glass of it at a restaurant?

An acquaintance of this columnist just posted a message on Facebook, and it wasn’t friendly. He wrote that, having dined that evening at a pizzeria in central Vienna, when settling the bill, he was enraged to find he had been charged €1.30 for a quarter-litre of tap water.

For a while now a small but increasingly bitter struggle has been building, not just in Vienna but across the country, over the value of water. The crux of the disagreement: should restaurants be allowed to charge for bog-standard tap water? It being perfectly normal custom to do so in other countries, particularly in regions with a strong dependence on tourism, increasing numbers of Austrian gastronomic outlets have begun charging for tap water if it is ordered by customers. Otherwise, they say, people would only ever drink free water. And because serving water, even straight from the tap, still accounts for valuable working hours, which have to be paid for somehow. Hmmm. Convinced? No, and neither are the Viennese.

Unlike in other places, water in Vienna is more than just a colourless liquid with a mildly chlorinated odour that appears like magic out of the tap. Firstly, Vienna’s water does not smell of chlorine, because it is arguably the finest water to flow out of the taps of city apartments anywhere in the world: Styrian spring water, no less, pumped directly into the capital through a pipeline specially built in 1873 and which supplies Vienna with fresh, clean and cold water to this day.

Vienna’s tap water is so pure and of such quality that anyone caught drinking water out of a bottle in the Austrian capital is likely to be looked at by passers-by as if they are soft in the head. After all, why pay good money for something, haul it home and generate yet another hyper-annoying container when you can access an endless supply of the same stuff-a high-quality, environmentally-friendly version, no less-simply by turning the tap in your kitchen? (OK, tap water isn’t fizzy, I grant you. But that’s as far as it goes.)

Istiklal Street and Taksim Square

16/06/2016 | TM6 | No Comments

Istiklal Street

Istiklal Caddesi is the main street of Beyoglu (Pera) and is a pedestrian area. The street that used to be called “Grand-Rue de Pera” during its bright times, was a modem meeting point by the beginning of the 20th century, during the best times (“Belle e’poque”) of Istanbul.

The cultural and social activities for different tastes as well as the cafes, cinemas, bookshops, restaurants, bars come out of istiklal Caddesi or the streets it has connection. There are many shops on the street.

At the south end of the street is the entrance of Tunel. Tunel is an underground railway system that is 570m, from 1875 extending to Galata Bridge and is the second underground of the world in terms of construction date after that of London. While walking towards Taksim, after passing Galatasaray Lisesi, you will see (Jigek Pasaji (Cite de Pera) on the left hand side.

As its Turkish name implies it used to be a passage that flowers were sold; today has many cheerful bars and ‘meyhane’s. It’s an ideal atmosphere to eat, to drink Turkish Raki and to feel Beyoglu. Balik Pazari is worth to see just next to the passage. Although it is prefered for finding fresh fish, you can explore the shops that you can find kind of meat, cheese, desserts, pickles, almost anything you can buy as you walk further Beyoglu.

Taksim Square

Taksim is one of the important centres of this multi-centred city. After Pera became popular and crowded the new type of urbanization moved to Nisantasi and Sisli neighbourhood; thus, Taksim has become an important centre. It was a cemetery area until the end of 19™ century. There was a large barrack in the middle of the square and the biggest football field in the city used to be in this barracks.

Taksim had become the most important square of the city during the years when the Republic was founded. It was the most expensive residential area in 1950s. The name of the square is Taksim due to the water coming from Belgrat Ormanlan used to distributed here in 18®1 century. The cistern, made by Mahmut U in 1732, is still at the entrance of Istiklal Caddesi. At the southwest of the square is the monumental statue of Taksim Cumhuriyet Aniti showing the founder of Ataturk, the founder of the Republic of Turkey and his friends, made by the Italian artist Canonica in 1928.

500 years of Ottoman Cuisim

Marianna Yerasimos

Otoman Cuisine with the mixture of modem recipes, reminding us the tastes which are almost desappeared.

99 recipes of Ottoman cuisine took place in the book Author Marianna Yerasimos’s 1,5 years work of modernizing the recipes gave its results.

It’s not only the recipes you’ll be reading in the book but also nutrition habits, how to behaved while eating and more to explore.